Race down to the superb Moray Motor Museum

A great place to visit during your stay at Carden Cottages is the Moray Motor Museum.  The museum is home to a superb collection of veteran, vintage and classic cars and motorbikes.

Moray Motor Museum is a fantastic hidden gem for Petrol Heads and people who love reminiscing about days gone by | Credit: Moray Motor Museum

Located in a light and airy old mill building in Elgin, part of which dates back to the era of Elgin Cathedral when the Bishops of Moray ruled Moravia, the museum creates a classic atmosphere that matches the vehicles inside.

Upon stepping aside you are greeted by the fantastically enthusiastic curator, Brian.  He shares some fantastic stories about the vintage cars and eras gone by.

It is immediately obvious how much care and passion has went into caring for the vehicles that are available for viewing and hiring.

The museum showcases some fantastic classic vehicles, dating as far back as 1904.  There is a tremendous display of immaculate vintage vehicles, with plenty of information regarding their history available to read.

Although the exhibition is small, the brilliant condition of the cars, combined with how rare they are and the fact that they are all in perfect working condition, certainly makes up for the lack of size.

My favourite car in the museum is the 1963 Tojeiro Ford.  The car was probably the first to be driven by a then young Jackie Stewart as a professional driver, and would have recorded successes such as Brands Hatch and Silverstone.  These interesting stories are part of what makes the museum so exciting!

The 1963 Tojeiro Ford is my favourite vehicle currently at Moray Motor Museum | Credit: Moray Motor Museum

There are also a variety of Corgi/Matchbox toy cars from around the 60s and 70s that evoke some fantastic childhood memories at the museum.

Moray Motor Museum also offers vintage wedding car hire, so you should definitely check out their website for more information if you plan to stay at Carden for your or a loved one’s wedding.

The museum, like Carden, has disabled access, making it accessible for everybody.

All of these memories can be seen for the price of £7 per adult, £3 for juniors (aged 5 – 14), £15 for families (two adults with children) and £6 for OAPs.

The opening hours for the Motor Museum are between 11am and 5pm every day from Easter Weekend until October.  For more information, you can contact them on 01343 544 933 or email them on info@moraymotormuseum.org

Moray Motor Museum is just a 10 minute drive from your stay at Carden Cottages and there is free parking on site.

Find out all that Burghead has to offer

Carden Cottages is surrounded by lots of gorgeous towns and villages.  One of my favourite villages is Burghead, a beautiful coastal settlement with a rich history.

Burghead is a beautiful coastal village off Moray Firth | Credit: Anne Burgess

The peaceful village is located on the shores of the Moray Firth in the North East Scotland and is known for its fantastic Pict history, beautiful scenery and the traditional burning of the Clavie.

The stunning seaside village is the perfect place to visit for relaxing or adventuring.  The beautiful views of the sea and wildlife are relaxing, and the various hidden historic sites make the village very exciting.

Burghead Visitor Centre

Burghead Visitor Centre offers a great insight into the history of the area | Credit: Andrew Curtis

There are lots of activities to do around Burghead, I would recommend first having a look around the Visitor Centre.  The centre sits where the former Coastguard lookout was, and gives visitors a unique insight into the history of the village.

Burghead Visitor Centre takes visitors through the history of the area, starting around 400AD and ending in present time.  In 2013 an extension feature was added to the building, which gives stunning views over the Moray Firth.  It also showcases the lives of the herring lasses who followed the herring fishing fleet from Barra to Lowestoft, and also information of the natural history of the headland and the Moray Firth.  It is open from 12 noon to 4pm daily from April until the end of September, you can call 01343 835 518 for more information.

The Burghead Well

Burghead Well has a mysterious history | Credit: Mick Garratt

The Burghead Well is another historic gem in the village.  The structure was cleared out in 1809 and has confused archaeologists since.  It remains a mystery by whom, when or why this incredible monument was created.

A flight of 20 stone steps lead down into the ground to a square chamber with a square rock-cut tank fed by an underwater spring.  When the chamber was cleared out objects recovered included a stone with a bull carved on it, part of a Pictish stone cross and bizarrely a number of Spanish coins.

There have been many theories regarding the function of the “well”, including:

  • a shrine to Celtic water deities
  • a place of ritual execution
  • an early Christian baptistery
  • a Pictish cult centre, later converted to Christian use

To visit the well you have to get a key for a locked gate from the Visitor Centre, to find out more, visit the Visitor Centre website.

Burghead Fort

Burghead was the site of a Pictish fort, occupying a good strategic site with clear views all round | Credit: Mary and Angus Hogg

The village of Burghead was built on top of a Pictish promontory fort.  It was one of the earliest power centres of the Picts and was three times the size of any other enclosed site in Early Medieval Scotland.  It is likely that the fort may have been the main centre of the Pictish Kingdom of Fortriu.

The remains of the fort were largely destroyed when the harbour and town of Burghead were remodelled in the early 19th century, but its layout is recorded in a plan drawn by William Roy in 1793.  Sections of its inner ramparts still stand up to 9.8 feet (3.0m) high, and a small section of the innermost outer rampart survives on Doorie Hill.

It is great to explore Burghead and try and spot the remains of its Pictish heritage.

The Burning of the Clavie

The Burning of the Clavie is an exciting tradition that brings good luck to everyone lucky enough to grab a piece of the smouldering embers | Credit: Anne Burgess

One of Burghead’s longstanding traditions is the burning of the Clavie every year on the 11th of January.  It is a fantastic event that I believe everybody should witness at least once in their life.

The unique fire festival is a day meant for greeting the New Year and bringing good luck to the people who attend the burning of the Clavie for the rest of the year.

The flaming Clavie (a barrel full of staves) is carried around the town followed by a large crowd until it reaches its final destination on top of Doorie Hill, on the ramparts of the ancient fort.  It is wedged there and allowed to burn out and fall downhill until it reaches the bottom, where people eagerly gather the smouldering embers.  If you are fortunate enough to be able to grab a piece of the Clavie then it is said that you will have good luck for the coming year.

It is a great sight to see if you are staying with Carden Cottages in January.

Dolphins & Wildlife

 

Dolphins can be spotted swimming in the Moray Firth from the shore at Burghead | Credit: Walter Baxter

As well as the stunning scenery Burghead has to offer, there is great wildlife on land, in the sky and in the sea.

One of the main wildlife attractions of Burghead is the birds, making it a fantastic place for keen bird watchers to visit.  The bay is a favourite wintering ground for many seabirds, such as scoter or eider, and the perfect summer fishing spot for spectacular osprey.

The town’s sea life is also incredible – with grey seals, porpoises, mink whales and dolphin swimming in the Moray Firth.  The Firth is home to the most northerly resident population of bottle nose dolphins in the world – and Burghead Headland offers a great vantage point for spotting them.

 

All of these great activities, historic treasures and beautiful wildlife can be found in Burghead at only a 10 minute drive from Carden Cottages.

Discover the history of Findhorn at the Icehouse and Heritage Centre

The Findhorn Village Icehouse and Heritage Centre are fantastic places to explore when staying with Carden Cottages.

No secrets of what lies within are given from the outside of the Icehouse | Credit: Tim N

 

Both the Icehouse and the Heritage Centre allow visitors to delve into the history of the area, delivering information about the salmon fishing industry in the Moray area and revealing the secrets of the Sands of Findhorn.

When I first visited these sites I didn’t know what to expect – but I was truly blown away by the vast amount of historic information that was on display, as well as the fantastic knowledge that the volunteers had!

The Icehouse contains fascinating underground chambers that were built to store ice for packing salmon on route to London.  You can explore the almost 150 year old chambers and admire displays that teach you about different aspects of the local salmon fishing industry.

While exploring these intriguing underground arched chambers, you can learn about the history of ice houses, the life cycle of the Atlantic salmon, salmon net fishing across the Moray coast and a fisherman’s life in the bothies.

The Findhorn Heritage Centre and Icehouse have some interesting displays about the history of the area | Credit: Lightfolio

In the Heritage Centre you can learn the secrets of the Sands of Findhorn and enjoy hearing stories of the village all through history from knowledgeable and enthusiastic volunteers.  With albums of historic photographs and texts on village history showcasing information covering all the way back to the earliest residents of Findhorn and the Bronze Age, this is the perfect place to go if you are interested in local history.

The Centre and Icehouse make learning about the history of Findhorn and its fishing industry interesting and exciting.  This is mainly down to the work of the fantastic volunteers who gathered all the information together and do a wonderful job of greeting everyone and answering any questions you have.

The Findhorn Village Heritage Trust Centre and Icehouse are open from 2pm to 5pm daily in June, July and August.  They are open on Saturdays and Sundays only during May and September.  Entry is free, but a donation can be given to help support the facilities and the volunteers.

Findhorn is only just over a 15 minute drive from your stay at Carden Cottages, making it a must visit during your holiday.

Discover the history of Kinloss Abbey

The ruins of a beautiful Abbey lie within the picturesque setting of Kinloss village.  It is a must visit for history fans and lovers of fantastic scenery when staying at Carden Cottages in the Moray area.

The fantastic remains of Kinloss Abbey lies in the beautiful landscape of Kinloss | Credit: Valenta

The Cistercian Abbey is a great place to visit to learn about history, folklore and to admire the beautiful ruins and surroundings.

The Kinloss Abbey was founded in 1150 by King David I of Scotland.  He was said to be hunting nearby when he was separated from the rest of his party.  Then, lost in the thick woodland that used to cover the majority of that area, he prayed for guidance.

It is said that he was then led by a dove to a shelter belonging to some shepherds where he spent the night.  During his slumber, he apparently dreamt that he was instructed to establish a church to give thanks for his rescue and marked out the plan of the Abbey with his sword the next morning, before leaving to find his party at Duffus Castle.

After he told his nobles of his vision, he called architects and masons that were working on various royal projects and ordered that the Kinloss Abbey would be created.  He remained at Duffus to oversee his project, until he was called away by other affairs.

The idea for Kinloss Abbey came to King David I of Scotland in a dream | Credit: Wikimedia

When King David I had to leave, he sent to Melrose for a monk, whom he set in charge over his builders and the rising monastery, of which he was afterwards made the first Abbot.

Upon visiting today, you can see that only ruins remain where the once richest Abbey in Scotland used to stand.  The remains of the South Transept with associated Chapel and the Sacristy with the Prior’s Chamber above can all be found and admired in Kinloss.

At the south and west are two near complete cloister walls one containing the Lavatorium and archway into the Refectory.  South of the Abbey, outside the cemetery is Abbot’s House.

From ground level you can see the remains of most of the foundations or low walls of the Abbey including the south wall of the church, the north Transept and many of the columns within the Nave.

Kinloss Abbey is surrounded by beautiful countryside | Credit: Kinloss Abbey Trust

Walking around the Abbey grounds, you can see information boards that are full of interesting facts that help guide you through the ruins.

Entrance to the Abbey grounds is free and is cared for by the Kinloss Abbey Trust.

Kinloss Abbey is only a 10 minute drive from Carden Cottages, and only around a 5 minute drive from Forres, where you can visit other historical sites such as Nelson’s Tower and Sueno’s Stone.

Escape at Hopeman

A great reason to visit Carden Cottages is to escape the hectic hustle and bustle of everyday life.  A great place to do this in the Moray area is the quaint village of Hopeman.

Hopeman beach is a great place to relax and take in surrounding scenery and wildlife

I love visiting Hopeman’s stunning beach, with family and friends, or even just on my own, to relax, take in the scenery and enjoy the wildlife.

Hopeman is well known for its beautiful beach, along with its exquisite wildlife.  From birds like the Curlew, the Oystercatcher and the Yellowhammer soaring above, to Bottlenose dolphins swimming in the sea, it checks all the boxes for fans of wildlife.

The seaside village also proudly presents lots of plaques in the area, informing visitors of it’s rich history.  Many of these sit alongside pieces that showcase the village’s relationship with the fishing industry, including the Braemou well and the Hopeman Harbour Crane.

Along with its beautiful scenery, Hopeman has some gorgeous colourful beach huts
The Braemou well was seen as a holy well, with people travelling from the surrounding area to wash their hands in the holy water.  According to the plaque, people have been coming on pilgrimages to the well from Elgin and beyond since the 17th century.  These people would venture by horse or by foot just to drink or wash their hands in the water.  They would also leave gifts for the spirit of the well, such as coins, buttons, pebbles or pieces of silk to ensure the potency of the power.

Standing proud by the harbour is the Hopeman Harbour Crane. Built in 1859 by Bowser and Cameron of Glasgow for the Clyde Navigation Trust, the cast and wrought iron crane cost around £102.50 in today’s money.  It most likely started its working life at one of the Clyde ports, preparing cargo for shipment to the Western Isles or Worldwide.

The Hopeman Harbour Crane stands proudly on the shore

It is believed that it was then bought by Wick Harbour Trust around 1880 to be used during the huge seasonal herring fishing.  Finally, it was taken to Hopeman in 1925 by a local engineer working in the village and remained operational until the 1970s. In 2012 it was refurbished to become the vibrant stand out piece of history that it is today.

The beautiful village is definitely a must visit during the summer. It has a rich history, beautiful scenery and fantastic wildlife.  All of this scenery, wildlife and history can be found at just a 15 minute drive from Carden Cottages.

Relax and Unwind at Elgin Biblical Garden

Elgin Biblical Garden is a beautiful, serene escape from the busy trials and tribulations of everyday life.

 

The Biblical Garden is a beautiful hidden gem in Elgin | Credit: Karen Bryan

The Garden sits between the medieval Elgin Cathedral and Cooper Park – a gift to Elgin from Colonel George A. Cooper in 1903.  It makes for a beautiful retreat from life, with 110 plants with Biblical references creating a delightfully vibrant landscape.

Although the garden is Biblical, you don’t have to have an interest in the Bible to appreciate the beauty and peacefulness of these glorious trees and flowers on a beautiful sunny day.  It is a fabulous place to relax and unwind and forget about the world for a few moments.

You can let your troubles and worries drift away as you take in the beautiful views, including a spectacular range of shrubs, herbaceous plants and trees such as Cercidiphyllum japonica and Liquidambar styraciflua.

Brightly coloured plants light up the Biblical Garden in Elgin | Credit: Biblical Garden

It is also the perfect spot to sit down for a nice relaxing picnic – on your own or with family, friends and loved ones.

If you are interested in learning more about the Bible, there are lovely statues situated throughout the garden.  There are also very interesting information boards located in various parts of the Biblical Garden.

The Biblical Garden has been open over 20 years now, opening in June 1996.  It was made possible by donations from local businesses, Churches, schools and organisations.  There was a lot of community involvement in its creation, with local schools making the fantastic mosaics which can be seen on the wall by the entrance.

Fantastic Mosaics at the entrance of the Biblical Garden | Credit: Biblical Garden

The garden has been very successful in attracting visitors from all over, and this success is owed to the hard work and partnership among the Friends of the Biblical Garden, Moray Council and Moray College UHI.  It is the perfect example of the community spirit that you will witness on your visit to the Moray Area.

The Biblical Garden is just one of many beautiful and tranquil landscapes in the Moray area, with a beautiful pond even sitting just a short walk away from Carden Cottages.  You will never be short of beautiful scenery and relaxing spots on your visit to Carden.

It is open to the public daily from May to September and is free to enter, but there is a donations box if you feel like leaving one.  You can drive to the Biblical Garden from Carden Cottages in under 15 minutes.  You could combine this trip with a visit to Elgin Cathedral, which is just across the road.

Try something new at Café Fika, Forres

One of my favourite places to sit back with a cup of coffee and do some work is Café Fika in Forres.

Café Fika is the perfect place to relax and unwind | Credit: Fika

 

The Swedish style café serves lovely organic and Fairtrade filter coffee, organic teas and organic hot chocolate.  They also offer cakes and biscuits, that change daily, that consist of gluten free and vegan options.  There are also delicious homemade Swedish style cinnamon buns available for a special treat on Fridays.

If you fancy more than a quick cuppa and a cake, they also have vegetarian and vegan soups, homemade sourdough, with vegetarian quiche and salads available on Thursdays and Fridays.

Café Fika offers a great range of vegan and vegetarian food | Credit: Fika

 

This café is a great alternative stop from the usual food and drink served in cafés.  It doesn’t serve your usual lattes, mochas, cappuccinos etc, but what you do get is a tasty filter coffee that is refilled, a range of teas and a lovely organic hot chocolate.

On my most recent visit I had my usual cup of coffee to fuel me for a bit of work and a nice vegan Brownie, because sod the diet!  The Brownie had lovely flakes of coconut in and felt a lot less sweet than a regular Brownie, therefore I didn’t feel so bad about breaking my diet.

The owners of Café Fika are a lovely couple who are always happy to have a nice chat.  You are guaranteed a warm welcome at Fika, as well as a full warm cup of coffee, as the staff will top up your cup for free!

The constant coffee refills and the relaxed atmosphere in the Swedish style café makes it the perfect place to relax unwind, switch off from the outside world or stick your head down and get some work done.  There isn’t too many tables, so it is never overcrowded or overly busy, which helps with trying to relax or trying to concentrate.

Café Fika is uncrowded, making it the perfect place for both working and relaxing | Credit: Fika

Café Fika is also a great place to inspire creativity.  There are regular poetry readings from local poets, a great alternative way to spend a Saturday afternoon.  Beautiful artwork by Swedish illustrators line the walls as well, which are great to admire while you enjoy your coffee.

Café Fika is only a 15 minute drive from your stay at Carden Cottages, and there is free parking not far away.

 

The real life story of Macbeth in Moray

Shakespeare’s tale of Macbeth is well known around the world, but the real story of the Scottish King is far lesser known.

There are may local legends regarding Macbeth in Moray and Inverness | Credit: Biography

Shakespeare mixed fact and fiction when creating his tale of Macbeth, drawing on the exciting real life tales of Macbeth and Duncan I of Scotland.  The Scottish King had many links to the Moray and Inverness areas, with many sites having at least a local legend regarding Macbeth.

Macbeth and Inverness

The son of Duncan I may have built his castle where the current Inverness Castle now stands, after he defeated Macbeth | Credit: Dave Conner

In The Bard’s play, Inverness was the home of Macbeth’s castle, where King Duncan I is killed in the play.  In the real world, Macbeth’s father, resided in the city, but not in the currently standing Inverness Castle.

Macbeth’s father most likely resided in a hill fort located at Auldcastle, now known as Auldcastle Road.  It is said that Malcolm Canmore, son of Duncan I, destroyed this fort after he defeated Macbeth.  He then built a new castle on the site of the current Inverness Castle.

The real death of Duncan I of Scotland

Duncan I of Scotland’s death happened very differently in real life | Credit: Wikimedia

As for the death of Duncan I of Scotland, he certainly wasn’t murdered in his sleep.  Donchad mc Crinian is depicted in Shakespeare’s Macbeth as an elderly king who was killed in his sleep by the play’s main character.  In real life, the actually rather young king lived until the age of 39, where he was killed in battle against Macbeth’s men in what is now known as Pitgavney, near Elgin in Moray.

Macbeth & Forres

Sueno’s Stone may have been a rallying point for the real life Macbeth and his troops | Credit: Kim Traynor

In Macbeth, Duncan’s castle is said to be in Forres, and the iconic scene when the Three Witches gather to predict the rise and downfall of Macbeth is set upon a hill nearby the ancient Scottish town.

It is also said that Sueno’s Stone, a 20ft Pictish cenotaph in Forres, might have been a rallying point for the real life Macbeth and his troops before they marched east to stop Duncan’s invasion.  The true meaning of Sueno’s Stone and its engravings remain a mystery to this day.

Macbeth’s Hillock

Macbeth’s Hillock in Forres is said to be the grassy mound upon which Macbeth and Banquo met the Weird Sisters | Credit: Wikimedia

According to local folklore, Macbeth’s Hillock is the “blasted heath” where the protagonist and Banquo meet the “Weird Sisters” and hear their prophecy that Macbeth is destined to be king.  This grassy mound is within walking distance of Brodie Castle, and I would definitely recommend you have a look at all the great historic artefacts inside the castle before taking the short walk to the hill. 

Carden Cottages is the perfect base for history and literature fans to explore the many sites in the Moray area related to Macbeth.  Our luxury cottages are just around an hour drive to Inverness, only a 15 minute drive from Pitgavney, a 20 minute drive to Brodie Castle – which is in walking distance of Macbeth’s Hillock and just over a 10 minute drive to Sueno’s Stone.

For more information about Macbeth and his real and fictional life and relation to different areas in Scotland, I thoroughly recommend checking out Visit Scotland’s Guide.

Explore the beautiful history of Brodie Castle

The beautiful Brodie castle is a must visit when exploring the Moray area.  The 16th– century castle has something for everyone – history, a wonderful art collection, beautiful gardens and a nature trail.

Brodie Castle is a beautiful rose coloured building with a rich history | Credit: Dr. Richard Murray

 

Brodie Castle was home to the Brodie clan for over 400 years, originally being built by the clan themselves in 1567.  Upon visiting the beautiful rose coloured building you can see how it has been shaped by history, with the original 1500s architecture having 17th century and Victorian additions.

When you have finished taking in the outside of the building, you can then venture inside to experience a unique insight into the past.  Stepping inside the castle is like stepping back in time, with priceless art work, antiques and other quirky historic artefacts.  The art gallery contains beautiful work from many artists, varying from Dutch Old Masters to modern watercolours.

On the outside, Brodie Castle is surrounded by beautiful gardens spanning over 71 hectares of ground.  The beautiful gardens boast incredible displays of a variety of flowers in the springtime, including bright blooming daffodils.  These gardens are great for a relaxing walk and for breathing in the tranquil surroundings.

Beautiful Daffodils bloom in the Brodie Castle Gardens | Credit: J. Thomas

There is also an adventure playground for the children, as well as a natural trail with observation hides for catching a glimpse of wildlife.  Therefore, there is something for the whole family!

The history at Brodie Castle doesn’t stop at the building itself – there is also a Pictish monument located on the close as you approach the castle.  Known as ‘Rodney’s Stone’, the two-metre high stone slab has some beautiful images carved into it.

Originally found in the grounds of the old church of Dyke and Moy, the stone has a large cross on one side and intricate engravings on the other, including two fish monsters, a “Pictish Beast”, a double disc and z-rod.

Rodney’s Stone sits on the close as you approach Brodie Castle | Credit: Ann Harrison

The castle is also located near Macbeth’s Hillock, where it is claimed that the hero of the Shakespearean tale had his encounter with the Weird Sisters.

The castle and estate’s opening times vary per season, right now in June Brodie Castle is open from 10am to 5pm daily, but from July until the end of August it will have extended hours of 9:30am until 6pm.

Ticket prices are: £11 for an adult, £35 for a family, £29 for a family with one adult, £9.50 for concessions and £6.50 for children.  For more information about ticket prices, visit the Brodie Castle website.

Brodie Castle is only a 20 minute drive from Carden Cottages.

Witness the spectacular burning of the Clavie in Moray

One of the most fantastic traditions in the Moray area is the burning of the Clavie in Burghead.  The ancient Scottish custom takes place every year in the small fishing village, and brings in people from all over the world.

Credited Scots Radio!

Every year, on the evening of the 11th of January (unless that date falls on a Sunday, in which case it would be the 10th of January) people gather in the North East to witness the spectacular event.  The 11th of January was New Year’s Eve, or Hogmanay as we say in Scotland, by the Julian calendar.

In the 1750s, the Julian calendar was reformed in Britain and the Gregorian calendar was introduced.  During this time of change, people rioted over their loss of 11 days – but the Brochers of Burghead decided that they would take this opportunity to celebrate New Year twice!

The Clavie is made up of wooden casks that have been split in two, then lit like a bonfire.  One of the casks is joined together by a huge nail and filled with tar and is then set alight.

Burghead has a rich history including the burning of the Clavie at the ancient fire festival | Credit: Anne Burgess

After it is set on fire, the Clavie is then paraded round the village in all its fiery glory by members of the Clavie Crew.  Only people who are natives of Burghead qualify to be part of this crew.

As they make their way through the town, members of the Clavie Crew hand out pieces of the Clavie to householders to ensure they have good luck for the following year.

The Clavie, along with its eager followers, makes its way up to the top of Doorie Hill, where it is wedged into the remains of an ancient fort, and a bonfire is formed from split casks.  Finally, when the blazing tar-barrel falls in pieces, everyone scrambles excitedly in hopes of getting a lighted piece with which to kindle their New Year’s fire.

The Clavie is carried through the town and up Doorie Hill by the Clavie Crew | Credit: Anne Burgess

The charcoal of the Clavie is also collected and put to good use – it is put in pieces up cottage chimneys to keep spirits and witches from forcing their way down and into people’s homes.

The burning of the Clavie dates back to the even further than the 1750s, but it is uncertain exactly when the tradition started.

If you want to start 2020 with a bang and bring yourself good fortune, book now to stay at Carden Cottages next year.  Our beautiful cottages are only an 11 minute drive from the beautiful village of Burghead.

If you want to get even closer to the action, then Burghead itself offers a wide range of B&B, Self Catering and Hotel accommodation.